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Oral Surgery

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dental extractions
Extractions

A dental extraction (also referred to as tooth extraction, exodontia, exodontics, or informally, tooth pulling) is the removal of teeth from the dental alveolus (socket) in the alveolar bone.

Extractions are performed for a wide variety of reasons, but most commonly to remove teeth which have become unrestorable through tooth decay, periodontal disease, or dental trauma, especially when they are associated with toothache. Sometimes wisdom teeth are impacted (stuck and unable to grow normally into the mouth) and may cause recurrent infections of the gum (pericoronitis). In orthodontics if the teeth are crowded, sound teeth may be extracted (often bicuspids) to create space so the rest of the teeth can be straightened.

Give us a call with any questions you may have about extractions. Dr. Ladani and his team make every effort to make you as comfortable as possible during your dental visits.

Tongue Tie Procedure

Tongue-tie (ankyloglossia) is a condition present at birth that restricts the tongue's range of motion.

With tongue-tie, an unusually short, thick or tight band of tissue (lingual frenulum) tethers the bottom of the tongue's tip to the floor of the mouth, so it may interfere with breast-feeding. Someone who has tongue-tie might have difficulty sticking out his or her tongue. Tongue-tie can also affect the way a child eats, speaks and swallows.

Sometimes tongue-tie may not cause problems. Some cases may require a simple surgical procedure for correction.

Signs and symptoms of tongue-tie include:

bulletDifficulty lifting the tongue to the upper teeth or moving the tongue from side to side

bulletTrouble sticking out the tongue past the lower front teeth

bulletA tongue that appears notched or heart shaped when stuck out

Frenectomy

The labial frenum connects the inside upper lip to the gum area near the front teeth, posing potential orthodontic and hygiene issues. When the labial frenum extends too near the gum line, it can affect the spacing and growth of a patient’s upper two front teeth. Although many parents and patients worry about the gap for cosmetic reasons, extra space between the teeth can make it easier for food to become stuck and contribute to gingivitis.